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ABSTRACT INFORMATION
Title: 'Language Outcomes of Children from Spanish-Speaking Families: A Multi-State Perspective'
Track: 3 - Language Acquisition and Development
Keyword(s): accountability, assessment, language outcomes, Spanish-speaking, NECAP
Learning Objectives:
  1. Describe the demographic characteristics of children with hearing loss from Spanish-speaking homes
  2. Characterize the language outcomes of children with hearing loss who are from Spanish-speaking homes
  3. List factors associated with more successful language outcomes

Abstract:

Many early intervention programs across the United States serve families who speak Spanish as their primary language, yet little documentation exists regarding the language outcomes of this important and growing population of children with hearing loss. Accurate characterizations of the language abilities of children with hearing loss from families in the United States who speak Spanish has been difficult for a variety of reasons including the difficulty of obtaining a sample that is sufficiently large to yield valid results given that this is a sub-sample of an already low-incidence condition. Through the National Early Childhood Assessment Project (NECAP, a program that is assisting interested states in joining efforts to create a national database of language outcomes for children with hearing loss), we have gathered language outcomes on a relatively large sample of young Spanish-speaking children with hearing loss (over 150) from seven different states. Data from this project indicate that, on average, children from Spanish-speaking families score 10 to 30 language quotient points lower (depending on the particular language skill measured) than children with hearing loss from English-speaking families. This presentation will describe the language abilities of children with hearing loss from Spanish-speaking homes, highlighting the language strengths and limitations of this population. This information can be used to guide interventionists in identifying and targeting the aspects of language that typically are the most challenging for this population of children. In addition, the demographic characteristics of this population will be described and child, family, and program characteristics that are associated with more successful language outcomes will be discussed.
Presentation: 1360AllisonSedey.pdf

1360AllisonSedey2.pdf

Handouts: Handout is not Available
PRESENTER(S) / AUTHOR(S) INFORMATION
Allison Sedey - Primary Presenter
University of Colorado-Boulder
     Credentials: Ph.D., CCC-SLP, CCC-A
     Other Affiliations: Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind
      Allison Sedey is a speech pathologist, audiologist, and research associate. She works for the University of Colorado-Boulder and the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind tracking speech and language outcomes of children who are deaf or hard of hearing between birth and 3 years of age throughout the state of Colorado. She is currently managing a project (NECAP) that involves establishing a national database of language outcomes for children with hearing loss from birth to 4. As part of this project she is assisting interested states in implementing statewide outcomes assessment.
      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.
Christine Yoshinaga-Itano - Co-Presenter
University of Colorado-Boulder
     Credentials: Ph.D., CCC-A, CED
     Other Affiliations: Marion Downs Center, Institute of Cognitive Science
      Dr. Christine Yoshinaga-Itano is a Research Professor in the Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences, faculty of the Institute of Cognitive Science, Center for Neurosciences at the University of Colorado, Boulder, Department of Otolaryngology and Audiology at the University of Colorado, Denver and the Marion Downs Center. In 1996 she developed the Marion Downs National Center. Since 1996, Dr. Yoshinaga-Itano has assisted many state departments of education and public health agencies, schools for the deaf and blind, and early intervention programs throughout the United States and its territories. In addition, she has served as a consultant for many countries currently developing their early hearing detection and intervention programs, including the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, China, Korea, Belgium, Poland, Spain, Austria, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Netherlands, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Thailand, Philippines, and South Africa.
      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.
Anna Clark - Author
University of Colorado-Boulder
     Credentials: M.A., CCC-SLP
     Other Affiliations: Colorado Home Intervention Program (CHIP)
      Anna Clark completed her Masters degrees in both Linguistics and Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences at the University of Colorado-Boulder. She has worked on research projects with children with hearing loss for 10 years and clinically with children and families affected by hearing loss for six years. She is currently an early intervention provider for the Colorado Home Intervention Program (CHIP) and primarily serves Spanish-speaking families. Additionally, she is a research associate and instructor at the University of Colorado-Boulder investigating the development of speech and language of children with hearing loss and teaching undergraduate courses in speech disorders and in auditory rehabilitation.
      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.