<< BACK TO AGENDA

ABSTRACT INFORMATION
Title: 'Accessibility: It’s All About Integrity: Supplementing Listening Checks With Integrity Checks to Assess Technological Functioning'
Track: 2 - Audiological Services
Keyword(s): Listening checks
Learning Objectives:
  1. List the key components to a hearing aid integrity assessment
  2. Define the difference between listening checks and integrity assessments
  3. List the importance of completing both assessments routinely

Abstract:

Studies in the 1970’s indicated that between 40-69% of hearing aids in a school setting had compromised functionality. More recent studies have shown no improvement in amplification functioning since that time (Burkhalter, Blalock, Herring, & Skaar, 2011). Teachers of the deaf, speech language pathologists, and audiologists are familiar with the Ling Six Sound Test as an assessment of basic auditory functioning. This test can provide quick and easy verification of auditory abilities, can establish continuity and preparedness for training and development of additional listening skills, and can serve as a guide for setting auditory learning goals (Miller, 2014). The test is easy to learn, has a variety of pragmatic applications, and requires only a basic knowledge of technology. The Ling Six Sound Test typically is based on repetition tasks; it may not provide a global assessment of the functioning of a student’s technology. What is not a part of the daily protocol when working with infants and young children, is the implementation of observations that assess the fit of new earmolds, new amplification, recently reprogrammed amplification, dead batteries, cochlear implant malfunction identification, which serve as a 'red flag' for problems related to hearing amplification systems. If the technology is not functioning properly, a young child, who cannot articulate how their amplification sounds, does not have access to undistorted sound because of the integrity of the technology. Although professionals are performing listening checks and collecting data on student auditory abilities; no one is performing integrity checks to assess optimal functioning of the technology through which the students receive their auditory input. The presentation today will discuss the importance of both listening and integrity checks, define the differences between the two, and demonstrate to teachers and therapists how perform listening and integrity checks acting as diagnosticians before therapy begins.
Presentation: Monday_Segell_1105_RebeccaHuzzy_1503.pdf

Handouts: Handout is not Available
CART: Topical Session 1- 1503.doc
PRESENTER(S) / AUTHOR(S) INFORMATION
Rebecca Huzzy - Co-Presenter,Author,POC
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
     Credentials: AuD, CCC-A
     Other Affiliations: Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children
      Rebecca Huzzy is a certified and licensed audiologist. A 2007 graduate of the Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania, she holds her certificate of clinical competence in the area of audiology from the American Speech-language & Hearing Association. Rebecca currently is in a clinical position at the Nemours/Alfred I. duPont Hospital for Children in Wilmington, Delaware and an educational position at the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech Pennsylvania.
      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.
Rachel Harris - Co-Presenter,Author
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
     Credentials: M.A.T. Teacher of the Deaf
      Rachel Harris is the mainstream itinerant teacher and coordinator for Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech/ Pennsylvania. She received her Masters of Arts in Teaching from The College of New Jersey in 2009. Rachel leads a team of mainstream itinerant teachers in providing hearing support services for students with hearing loss in grades preschool through 12 across the greater Philadelphia/Southern New Jersey region. The team prides itself on supporting students by focusing on development of students' auditory skills, self advocacy skills, and background knowledge of vocabulary and concepts; all coupled with a strong focus on collaboration between the students, parents, teachers, administrators, and related service providers.
      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.
Judy Sexton - Co-Presenter,Author
Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech
     Credentials: Judy Sexton M.S., C.E.D., LSLS Cert. AVEd
      Judy Sexton is the Director of Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech in Pennsylvania. Judy holds a Masters Degree in Education of the Hearing Impaired. Her work experiences include 35 years in the public and private school systems as an itinerant hearing therapist , resource room teacher and classroom teacher in preschool, elementary, middle and high schools. In addition, Judy has been in administration for over 15 years in listening and spoken language programs.
      ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.