16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/27/2017  |   11:05 AM - 11:35 AM   |  Eliciting Language from Littles: Developing Language Elicitation Strategies in Pre-Service Teachers   |  Grand Hall D

Eliciting Language from Littles: Developing Language Elicitation Strategies in Pre-Service Teachers

Special education teachers exit the field at twice the rate of their general education peers (COPSSE, 2004), greatly impacting outcomes for young children and families. Lack of clinical skills and support are top reasons for attrition (Hasbrouck, 1997; Anderson & Radencich, 2001). Once practicing independently, special education teachers struggle to apply concepts learned in preparation programs if they have not had ample experience (Boe, Cook, Sunderland, 2006, Whitaker, 2000). Conversely, preparation programs which use reciprocal peer coaching and mentoring (RPCM) at the beginning of a preparation program and continue through graduation provide varied, multiple opportunities for improvement in the development of highly qualified teachers who are skilled at transferring pedagogy to practice (Anderson & Radencich, 2001). To positively affect EI services, deaf education programs must train university students to coach parents in using language elicitation strategies (LES). However, prior to competently coaching parents, pre-service teachers of the deaf must first master LES themselves. Faculty in a deaf education master’s program have developed an efficient, effective method for developing the LES of graduate students RPCM, a method designed to help develop these skills in teachers in training. RPCM is a process by which graduate students practice new teaching methodologies, perfect existing techniques, utilize shared problem-solving skills, and receive feedback from a peer evaluator. This session will focus on the clinical component of graduate students’ first year of studies in which they, along with university faculty, use RPCM to provide language therapy to young children with hearing loss. Video footage will be shared that shows how faculty foster skills in graduate over two semesters. Graduates who have been through this process shared that they feel confident in their clinical abilities, meaning they are more likely to remain in the field, positively affecting outcomes for children with hearing loss and their families.

  • Participants will identify pre-service practices that positively affect outcomes for young children with hearing loss and their families.
  • Participants will evaluate video footage which shows university faculty developing language elicitation strategies in pre-service teachers of the deaf.
  • Participants will formulate a plan to better develop the language elicitation strategies of the professionals with whom they work

Presentation:
15804_5752SarahAmmerman.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5752.RTF


Presenters/Authors

Blane Trautwein (), UT Health Science Center San Antonio, trautwein@uthscsa.edu;
Dr. Blane Trautwein is the Program Director of the Deaf Education and Hearing Science (DEHS) Program at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. He was formerly a teacher and later principal at Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children. Dr. Trautwein has an undergraduate degree in deaf education and graduate/doctoral degrees in educational leadership.He has co-presented and co-authored about the topic of reciprocal peer coaching/mentoring in the professional preparation and continuing education of deaf education educational faculty. In 2012, Dr. Trautwein was awarded a University of Texas Health Science San Antonio Presidential Teaching Excellence Award.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Sarah Ammerman (), UT Health Science Center, ammerman@uthscsa.edu;
Dr. Sarah Ammerman is an Assistant Professor in the Deaf Education and Hearing Science (DEHS) Program at the University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio. She was formerly a teacher at the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech in Bryn Mawr, Pennsylvania. Dr. Ammerman has a dual-major undergraduate degree in deaf education (comprehensive) and elementary education, a master’s degree in deaf education (listening and spoken language), and a doctoral degree in special education with a minor in audiology.She has co-presented and co-authored about the topic of reciprocal peer coaching/mentoring in the professional preparation and continuing education of deaf education educational faculty. Dr. Ammerman is the President of the Association of College Educators-Deaf and Hard of Hearing.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.