16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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  |  Longitudinal Assessment of Language & Social/Emotional Outcomes for Toddlers Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing in Wisconsin

Longitudinal Assessment of Language & Social/Emotional Outcomes for Toddlers Who Are Deaf/Hard of Hearing in Wisconsin

The Wisconsin Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) program, Wisconsin Sound Beginnings (WSB), is a participant in the National Early Childhood Assessment Project (NECAP) study. In addition to collecting standardized language measures, WSB has also been collecting additional data on social/emotional development. For this proposal, analyses of the data will explore variables that predict both the language and social/emotional developmental outcomes of children who are deaf/hard of hearing in the state of Wisconsin. Participating families were asked to complete demographic and developmental assessments when their child was 14-18 months old (Phase I) and again when their child was 30-36 months old (Phase II). The extensive demographic information collected (i.e. gender, age, race/ethnicity, native language, maternal education level, degree and configuration of hearing loss, age at identification, prevalence of co-occurring conditions, age at enrollment in early intervention, and type and intensity of early intervention) was used to predict outcomes on three standardized developmental assessments (MacArthur Bates Communication Development Inventory, Minnesota Child Development Index, Greenspan Social/Emotional Growth Chart) at both time points of testing. Results show that n=85 families completed the questionnaires at Phase I, and n=47 families completed Phase II. Preliminary analysis shows that: 1. This sample of toddlers, as a whole, have met the JCIH 1,3,6 guidelines. 2. There are significant differences in both linguistic and social/emotional development for toddlers who have multiple handicaps. 3. At Phase 1, almost all toddlers are scoring within the normal range on all three assessments. 4. Of the n=47 families who completed both Phase I and Phase II, only a small percentage of the results was predicted by age of identification of hearing loss, age of amplification, and age of enrollment in Birth to 3 Program services.

  • Understand the assessment procedures for data collection
  • Understand how Wisconsin's EHDI program (WSB) is meeting JCIH guidelines
  • Explore the relationship between langauge, social/emotional outcomes and meeting JCIH guidelines

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Presenters/Authors

Christi Hess (), Waisman Center-Wisconsin Sound Beginnings, christi.hess@wi.gov;
Christi Hess is one of Wisconsin Sound Beginnings’s CARES Specialists. Originally from Baltimore, Christi lived and worked in Madison as a PhD student/researcher and an early intervention provider with the Birth to 3 Program before joining Wisconsin Sound Beginnings in 2014. Both her clinical work and research focuses on toddlers who are Deaf or Hard of Hearing. She received her BS in Communication Sciences and Disorders and MS in Speech Language Pathology from James Madison University in Virginia. She worked in New York City for two years as a speech-language pathologist for New York Eyes and Ear’s Cochlear Implant Center and Strivright/The Auditory Oral School of New York providing auditory rehabilitation as well as speech/language therapy to children ages 0-5. Christi has experience in multiple modes of communication ranging from American Sign Language to Auditory Oral/Verbal.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Kayla Kristensen (), Waisman Center, kayla.kristensen@wisc.edu;
Kayla is currently a Research Associate working on the Wisconsin Sound Beginnings EHDI Impact project. She also works for the University Center for Excellence In Developmental Disabilities as an Associate Clinical Speech Pathologist.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Elizabeth Seeliger (), WSB, elizabeth.seeliger@dhs.wi.gov;
Elizabeth has worked as a clinical audiologist in a variety of settings, helping to guide children and families through the process of diagnosis and intervention of hearing loss. As the Wisconsin Sound Beginnings (WSB) Program Director Elizabeth has played a leadership role in the development of a data, tracking and referral system, developed educational resources for hospitals, providers and an interactive notebook for parents. Elizabeth has also spearheaded the initiative to enable WI homebirth midwives to provide UNHS. Elizabeth has also provided technical assistance and consultation locally and internationally on quality improvement in EHDI systems. Elizabeth currently sits on the board of directors for the WI Chapter of Families for Hands & Voices and Hands & Voices HQ.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Connie Stevens (), UW-WI Madison, supporting WI Department of Health Services, cstevens4@waisman.wisc.edu;
Connie began work in EHDI after receiving news that her seven month old daughter was deaf. An Applied Sociologist by training, she delved into the topic, researching best practices and available resources for her family. For five years, she was Program Director for Shore to Shore, for families with d/hh members, coordinating and leading parent support groups and sign language classes. Connie was a founding member of and secretary for Wisconsin Families for Hands & Voices. In 2006, Connie became a Guide By Your Side (GBYS) Parent Guide. Since 2009, she's worked with Wisconsin Sound Beginnings, representing the parent perspective, helping reduce loss to follow-up by connecting with families and providers, and connecting with families and Early Intervention Programs post-identification. Connie attends many EHDI, d/hh and family support conferences. She's co-authored the state’s “Babies and Hearing Loss Interactive Notebook”. She was also a member of the National Center for Cultural Competence-NCHAM Community of Learners.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Rebecca Martin (), WI DHS, rebecca.martin@wi.gov;
Rebecca Martin, MPH, IMH-E(II) is the Outreach Specialist Coordinator at Wisconsin Sound Beginnings, working to support families and providers throughout EHDI. She has a decade of experience in health education, home visitation, case management, communications and advocacy. With a focus on high-risk, minority, immigrant and teen parents and their young children, Rebecca has provided intensive case management, intervention, education and support around parent-child relationships, child development, family stability, domestic violence and physical/emotional health. Rebecca completed her public health Preceptorship at a community health center in rural Wisconsin working with Amish and Hispanic communities. Rebecca served as a Peace Corps Volunteer, working to better maternal/child health and improve community organization. She is a graduate of UW-Madison’s Infant, Early Childhood and Family Mental Health certificate program and has earned her Level II Infant Mental Health Endorsement as an Infant Family Specialist for culturally sensitive, relationship-focused practice promoting infant mental health.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Anne Harris (), Waisman Center, harris@waisman.wisc.edu;
Anne is the Principal Investigator for the EHDI Impact Grant. Her's research background is wide ranging covering efficacy of interdisciplinary clinical service models and interdisciplinary interventions, the effects of prematurity on growth and feeding development, program evaluation, screening for nutrition, health and developmental risk. She is the LEND Director, and educates/trains students in interdisciplinary curricula, clinical, research, program evaluation, Public Health - MPH fieldwork supervision, Dietetics training, Public Health Nutrition, Maternal and child nutrition, Curriculum development, including distance-learning formats.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -