16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/28/2017  |   3:00 PM - 3:30 PM   |  Two Methods of Intervention with Spanish-Speaking Families: Direct Service Provision and Intervention Through an Interpreter   |  Hanover A

Two Methods of Intervention with Spanish-Speaking Families: Direct Service Provision and Intervention Through an Interpreter

Increasing research evidence indicates that children with hearing loss can learn multiple spoken languages. Moreover, learning the language of the home does not impede acquisition of the majority language but rather, can accelerate it. Encouraging development of the home language also facilitates family involvement and maintains the family-child bond. With a rising number of children with hearing loss in the U.S being identified from Spanish-speaking homes, there is an ever increasing need to provide effective intervention in Spanish. The initial portion of this presentation will consist of a compilation of information and resources gathered from the experiences of a bilingual speech-language pathologist who works with families from over 10 different Spanish speaking countries. Intervention topics will include how to use culturally-relevant themes and holidays, as well as songs, books, vocabulary and sound-object associations to demonstrate how intervention can be provided directly in Spanish. This presentation will also highlight differences in Spanish versus English language development; variations in word usage that are regional/dialect dependent will also be discussed. These factors are all necessary considerations as a part of a comprehensive bilingual program. However, access to bilingual speech-language services for families remains severely limited. In fact, just 6% of SLPs meet the definition of ‘bilingual’ according to the American Speech-Language Hearing Association. As such, monolingual English-speaking SLPs and early interventionists will often rely upon interpretation and translation to deliver their services to linguistically diverse populations. Therefore, in addition to discussing direct service delivery in Spanish, this presentation will also address questions that most commonly arise when integrating an interpreter into a session with the caregiver and child, such as: “When is an interpreter really needed?” or “How do I conduct a skills-based assessment through an interpreter?” Considerations for customizing the mode of interpretation based on therapeutic goal will also be shared.

  • Gain knowledge regarding how to provide intervention to children with hearing loss directly in Spanish and how to adjust goals/activities to be culturally and linguistically relevant
  • Cite differences between Spanish and English language development and how to access appropriate resources to track Spanish language development
  • Learn how to adjust planning and assessment to integrate an interpreter as well as how to tailor the mode of interpretation to support a therapeutic goal

Presentation:
15804_5653AneeshaFairley.pdf

15804_5653SarahRadlinski.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5653.doc


Presenters/Authors

Aneesha Fairley (), Audtiory-Verbal Center, Inc, afairley@avchears.org;
Aneesha joined Auditory-Verbal Center, Inc. in January of 2011 after serving families of children with hearing loss in both North Carolina and Florida. She received her Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology in 2004 and her Doctor of Philosophy in Speech & Hearing Sciences in 2010 from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has a Certificate of Clinical Competence in Speech-Language Pathology from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) and a license in Speech-Language Pathology from the Georgia Board of Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology. Aneesha is also a certified Listening and Spoken Language Specialist of the Alexander Graham Bell Academy. She piloted the teleintervention program for AVC in 2011.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Sarah Radlinski (), Auditory-Verbal Center, Inc, sarah@avchears.org;
Sarah joined the Auditory-Verbal Center, Inc. in Atlanta, Georgia in June 2014. She completed her Bachelor’s degree in Communication Sciences and Disorders, with minors in Linguistics and Spanish, from the University of Florida. She earned her Master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology from Vanderbilt University. Sarah was on the pediatric hearing loss specialty track at Vanderbilt and treated children with hearing loss and their families according to the principles of Auditory-Verbal therapy. Sarah is proficient in Spanish and serves Spanish-speaking children and families in their native language. Sarah has her Certificate of Clinical Competence from the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and is licensed to practice speech-language pathology in the state of Georgia.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.