16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/27/2017  |   2:00 PM - 2:30 PM   |  EI Snapshot: Family Perceptions on Early Intervention for Children Who Are D/HH   |  Hanover A

EI Snapshot: Family Perceptions on Early Intervention for Children Who Are D/HH

An important mission of a state EHDI system is to ensure that families of newly-identified infants who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH) get connected with early intervention (EI) services and family support groups in a timely manner. However, little data are available to inform us about the extent to which this occurs throughout the country and how the processes for accessing and receiving EI vary across states. A recent NCHAM study – Early Intervention Systematic Nationwide Analysis of Programs’ Strengths, Hurdles, Opportunities, and Trends (SNAPSHOT) funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau investigated the extent to which families of children who are D/HH from ten states were informed about and received comprehensive early intervention services. Families identified through state EHDI and Part C programs received a written survey that asked parents to report their experiences in getting connected with EI services, the intensity and comprehensiveness of services received, their knowledge of and connections with family support organizations, and transition to Part B preschool experiences. A subset of families was interviewed to obtain “the story behind the numbers” via qualitative information. Results reflect diversity in family experiences in regard to access to and comprehensive of EI services. Access to information about family support organizations was one of the biggest challenges reported by families as was access to services in some communication modalities. This presentation will present quantitative and qualitative findings pertaining to family perceptions of EI services and family supports. Examples of state procedures and practices that correspond with high family satisfaction will be presented. Quotes from families that depict their experiences will complement the data.

  • To understand the EI successes and challenges experienced by families of children who are D/HH
  • To understand state-level strategies to support family access to EI services and supports
  • To consider how results from a national study can guide system improvement in the learner’s home state and community.

Presentation:
15804_5763DianeBehl.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5763.doc


Presenters/Authors

Diane Behl (), NCHAM, diane.behl@usu.edu;
Diane Behl is a Senior Faculty member at the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management. She facilitates telehealth learning communities and is a co-investigator for cost-effectiveness studies. She has expertise in evaluating the effectiveness of service coordination provided via Part C Early Intervention and Maternal and Child Health programs. Diane was a primary researcher on the EI SNAPSHOT study.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Sara Doutre (), NCHAM, saradoutre@gmail.com;
Sara Doutre is a PHD student studying sociobehavioral epidemiology at Utah State University. She has an MA in education policy studies and a BS in elementary and special education. A former special education teacher, she currently consults with state departments of education and health on special education policy. Her six-year-old daughter is deaf due to congenital cytomegalovirus.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Heather Mariger (), Utah State University, heather.mariger@usu.edu;
Heather Mariger is a research scientist with the NCHAM at Utah State University where she is currently working on the Early Intervention Systemic Nationwide Analysis of Programs’ Strengths, Hurdles, Opportunities, and Trends (EI SNAPSHOT) project. Heather comes to NCHAM through an unusual route. Classically trained in Culinary Arts and Hospitality she has worked and studied across both the US and Europe. While working on her Masters Degree at Kansas State University, she became intrigued by the possibilities that the Internet promised for higher education. These interests led her to Utah State where, while working on her Doctorate in Instructional Technology, she became involved in disability research – and has never looked back. She has worked across a wide variety of assignments including projects to: create videos, websites and a curriculum to teach parents and paraprofessionals about the use of naturalistic interventions in teaching young children; develop a set of indicators and resources to promote web accessibility in higher education; and design training and protocols for a large-scale intervention/control study on the effect of an additional school 25 days on children in K-3rd grade. She is currently working on a study to help understand the state of early intervention services for children who are D/HH and their parents across the US. Her interests include Usability, Accessibility, the use of internet and mobile technologies to promote parent services and support, and Inclusive Tourism/Hospitality.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.