16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/27/2017  |   2:30 PM - 3:00 PM   |  Risk Factors for Permanent Congenital Hearing Loss in Hawaii   |  Hanover B

Risk Factors for Permanent Congenital Hearing Loss in Hawaii

Hearing loss is one of the most common permanent health conditions identified in the newborn population. Hawaii has one of the highest rates of permanent congenital hearing loss, with an overall rate of 2.9 per 1,000 newborns screened in 2014, in comparison to the US rate of 1.6 per 1000 newborns screened. To identify the risk factors associated with permanent congenital hearing loss in Hawaii, a total of 132,197 newborns from a linked birth certificate and hearing loss data set from 2008-2014 were analyzed. Prevalence estimates of hearing loss and associations with low birthweight and specific demographic characteristics were obtained. Multivariate logistic regression modeling was conducted to determine risk factors associated with hearing loss. Results showed that newborns that were very low or moderately low birthweight, certain race/ethnic populations, Hawaii county, were more likely to have hearing loss. Limitations and conclusions will be discussed. Raising awareness about the increased rate in Hawaii, and further evaluation of these associations may help inform activities to improve detection and prevention of hearing loss.

  • To identify the risk factors for permanent congenital hearing loss in Hawaii
  • To raise awareness about the increased rate in permanent congenital hearing loss Hawaii
  • To improve detection and prevention of hearing loss.

Presentation:
15804_5799Carlotta Ching TingFok.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5799.docx


Presenters/Authors

Carlotta Ching Ting Fok (), Hawaii Department of Health, chingting.fok@doh.hawaii.gov;
Dr. Carlotta Fok is currently a research statistician for the Family Health Services Division, Department of Health in Hawaii. She received her doctoral and master degrees in quantitative psychology. Prior to coming to Hawaii, she was a research scientist for the Center for Alaska Native Health Research, University of Alaska Fairbanks, focusing on health disparities research. She has almost 10 years of experience in prevention research and first authored several publications in prevention and statistics journals.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.