16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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  |  Controlling False Positives: Tactics That Work to Bring Down Refer Rates with Data from Multiple Sites as Evidence

Controlling False Positives: Tactics That Work to Bring Down Refer Rates with Data from Multiple Sites as Evidence

Hearing loss is not only one of the most common conditions present at birth, but also one that can have long-lasting effects on a child’s development if left undetected. Most states have supported universal newborn hearing screening through legislation or voluntary screening programs. Protocols and quality benchmarks vary throughout the U.S., but there are common challenges faced by screening programs and one consistently identified is high refer rates. Hospitals in three states are the subject of this report that focuses on managing this challenge. According to Indiana EHDI quality assurance, refer rates should be approximately 1.5%-4%. Although the level of nursery care and daily census differ from hospital to hospital, their overall quality objectives are the same. Two Indianapolis hospital screening programs are the subject of this report. The California Children’s Services Manual and Inpatient Standards for infant hearing screening programs established final refer rates no greater than 5% and no less than 1% with ABR screening technology. Two very different Southern California hospital screening programs are additional sources of data for this report. Finally, the Georgia Department of Public Health, Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program Policies and Procedures Manual states that final refer rates should be not exceed 4%. Of the two hospitals reported, one site has a lower census well born population with an SCN. The other is a higher census hospital with level 3 NICU. Upon close observation and tracking of screening practices at all six of these program sites, tactics and strategies have emerged that can be adopted to avoid high refer rates. By following specific guidelines that could be applied to other hospitals, YTD refer rates have continued to decrease at these programs and are being presented as a way to address this challenge regardless of the newborn population screened.

  • Identify methods to improve the quality of a hospital based newborn hearing screening program
  • Understand tactics that help to reduce refer rates
  • Review data from hospital based site across the country

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Presenters/Authors

Denise Metalsky (), Natus Peloton Incorporated, denise.metalsky@natus.com;
Denise Metalsky is an Audiology professional with over 20 years of experience in the Hearing Healthcare Industry. Her background includes Medical Devices Sales and Marketing, Universal Newborn Hearing Screening and direct patient care in the form of Clinical Audiology. She has been the Southern California Area Supervisor with Peloton Screening Services for over two years, serving babies and their families. She lives with her husband and two children in Redondo Beach.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Salary for Employment from Natus Medical Inc..  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Tammy Uehlin (), Natus Peloton Incorporated, Tammy.Uehlin@natus.com;
Tammy Uehlin, Au.D., CCC-A received a Bachelor of Science (Speech/Language Pathology) and Master of Communication Disorders (Audiology) from Auburn University and Doctor of Audiology from the University of Florida. She has been a member of the American Speech Language and Hearing Association, (ASHA) for over 25 years. Her experience in clinical audiology includes working at the University of Alabama Birmingham (UAB) Hospital, Veterans Administration Medical Center, HealthSouth Rehabilitation, and in private practice at an otorhinolaryngology office. Her background in newborn hearing screening includes providing screenings, training and management in the hospital setting and working as an Audiology Consultant for a newborn hearing screening company. She served as the Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Coordinator for the state of Georgia prior to joining Natus Medical/Peloton Screening Services as an Area Supervisor for Georgia and Florida.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Salary for Employment from Natus Medical, Inc..   Receives Salary for Employment from Employee.   Receives Salary for Employment from Employee.  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Megan Caldwell (), Natus Peloton Incorporated, megan.caldwell@natus.com;
Megan Caldwell holds a BA in Health Services Management, a MS in Health Management and a certification from NAMSS: Certified Professional Medical Services Manager (CPMSM). Her background includes working with nurses, physicians, and administration in the primary care setting as a Staffing Supervisor and Credentialing Supervisor prior to joining the Peloton Screening Services division of Natus Medical Inc. as an Area Supervisor and working directly with Newborn Hearing Screening and Early Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Programs for multiple hospitals across multiple states. She lives with her fiancé and little boy in Camby, IN.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Salary for Employment from Natus Medical.   Receives Salary for Employment from Natus Medical.  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.