16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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  |  Portable Visual Reinforced Audiometry (VRA) Hearing Screenings in the Community

Portable Visual Reinforced Audiometry (VRA) Hearing Screenings in the Community

Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EDHI) programs developed protocols for objective hearing screenings, such as automated auditory brainstem response (AABR) screener and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Current research indicates that if children are identified with hearing loss and are provided amplification at or around 6 months of age, they could develop age appropriate speech and language skills. At this time, there are no behavioral response screening measures in the community setting for young children with a cognitive age of 6 months to 2.5 years of age. The aim of this study was to examine the validity of a behavioral hearing screening tool for children ages 6 months to 2.5 years using portable visual reinforced audiometry (VRA) in a community setting as a part of an Audiology Capstone Project. This study tested 10 children (age 7 to 45 months) who passed bilateral distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) screening. The children were tested in the soundfield using the portable VRA for their minimal response level to narrowband noise stimulus at 1000 Hz, 2000 Hz, and 4000 Hz. The suggested pass screening rate for VRA is 30 dB HL, according to the ASHA Guidelines for Audiologic Screening (1997). The equipment used in this study was a computer based audiometer built through MatLab, an external monitor to display video clips as reinforcement, a loud speaker, and a sound level meter. The results found seven children passed the behavioral hearing screening using portable VRA in a community setting. One child referred on the portable VRA screening and further testing was warranted. Two other children were excluded from the study due to their unwillingness to participate. In future development, this tool could be used to screen hearing for children with developmental disabilities or with autism spectrum disorder so they can be tested in their comfort setting.

  • Audiologists can describe an alternative method for behavioral hearing screenings in the community for children with a cognitive age between 6 months - 2.5 years.
  • Participants can identify the percentage of children with congenital and late onset hearing loss.
  • Audiologists can define the current protocol for objective hearing screenings for children ages 6 months – 2.5 years.

Presentation:
15804_5786BridgetShanahan.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
CART transcripts are NOT YET available, but will be posted shortly after the conference


Presenters/Authors

Jon Douglas (), University of Wisconsin Waisman Center, jondouglas@wisc.edu;
Jon C. Douglas, AuD is a clinical audiologist at the University of Wisconsin Doctor of Audiology Program. In addition, Dr. Douglas is the LEND Audiology Clinical Faculty at the Waisman Center University Center for Excellence in Developmental Disabilities. He specializes in diagnostic hearing evaluations in children and adults with different abilities. In addition, Dr. Douglas is the clinical audiologist on the LEND Pediatric Audiology Supplement grant to improve pediatric audiology training.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Amy Hartman (), University of Wisconsin Doctor of Audiology Program, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders , amy.hartman@wisc.edu;
Dr. Hartman’s clinical focus is working with deaf and hard of hearing children. She is particularly interested in audiologic assessment of infants and young children and (central) auditory processing evaluations. Dr. Hartman has clinical expertise in the area of diagnostic audiologic assessment and hearing aid assessments and fittings for the pediatric population. Her previous clinical experiences include work at a children’s hospital and a large multi-specialty clinic. Dr. Hartman has clinical experience in the areas of behavioral diagnostic testing, electrophysiological assessment, including sedated and non-sedated auditory brainstem response testing, newborn hearing screening, (central)auditory processing evaluations, and the fitting of hearing aids and other assistive listening devices.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Bridget Shanahan (), University of Wisconsin-Madison, bridget.shanahan@wisc.edu;
Bridget Shanahan is a fourth year Audiology extern from University of Wisconsin Audiology Consortium Program. She is completing her externship at Boston Children's Hospital where she is also a LEND fellow.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.