16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

<< BACK TO AGENDA

2/28/2017  |   3:45 PM - 4:15 PM   |  But We Need Something Now: Simplifying Amplification and F.M. Use   |  Hanover A

But We Need Something Now: Simplifying Amplification and F.M. Use

It is well documented that the use of FM systems helps maximize children’s hearing and learning capabilities, often referred to as “The FM Advantage”. But how do we provide this advantage to children who, for a variety of reasons, may not have yet been fitted with hearing aids, whose aids are not FM compatible (gasp!) or for whom hearing aids are not an option? We all know them. They may have a diagnosis of mild hearing loss, fluctuating losses, unilateral losses, or auditory neuropathy. They may be struggling with developing speech and language skills and keeping up with their peers, or they may be doing well, but be absolutely exhausted from the effort it takes to keep up. In addition, tight budgets might mean that a pre-school program or school program has a lot of difficulty finding affordable solutions to meet these children’s needs. (Not to mention how administrators feel when the auditory training system they have just purchased cannot be used anymore because the family moved elsewhere.) This Montana team will share case studies, information regarding the use of FM telecoil neck loop systems, and options for using these systems to directly connect to technology such as computers and tablets. This presentation will explain the benefits of using these systems for children with all degrees of hearing loss, hearing aids and cochlear implants. In addition, they will explain how children with mild losses, unilateral losses and auditory neuropathy have successfully used attenuated headsets with this system, and how it can easily be converted to be used with children who have hearing aids. Additional benefits will be discussed including: reduced cost and flexibility that schools enjoy, and examples of unique and entertaining ways students have found to make these systems work for them.

  • Identify potential candidates for an F.M. neckloop or attenuated F.M. neck loop
  • Explain the cost difference and benefits between an F.M. neck loop and traditional personal F.M. systems
  • Describe situations when the use of an attenuated F.M. or neck loop might be considered

Presentation:
15804_5729SarahEyer.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5729.doc


Presenters/Authors

Sarah Eyer (), Montana School for the Deaf and Blind, Seyer@msdb.mt.gov;
Sarah Eyer, M.S.Ed, is an Outreach Consultant for Deaf and Hard Hearing at the Montana School for the Deaf and Blind (MSDB). Sarah has taught regular education in public schools, classes at MSDB, and worked as an Outreach Consultant for MSDB coordinating services and providing technical support to students in the mainstream setting for over 15 years. In addition to presenting at numerous state conferences, Sarah provides training for University teacher-prep classes, and in-services for educators and administrators throughout the state. Sarah has also worked as a Compliance Monitor for the State Office of Public Instruction insuring Special Education program compliance. Leadership positions include, Chairman of the State Special Education Advisory Panel, President of Montana Council for Exceptional Children, and an Officer on the State Council of the Comprehensive System of Professional Development (CSPD). Her most valuable education came from raising three sons, her oldest of whom is Deaf.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Kathleen Johnson (), Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind, kjohnson@msdb.mt.gov;
Kathleen Johnson, M.S. has been the audiologist at the Montana School for the Deaf and the Blind for 37 years. She was an educational audiologist prior to this in Great Falls, Montana. She has also served as a parent/infant advisor for deaf/hard of hearing babies and their families. In addition, she has been the Montana Director of the Healthy Hearing Program for Special Olympics for the past 11 years. A highlight of her career was attending the World Special Olympic Games in Iowa. As part of the School Outreach services, she can provide audiological and consultative services to any child from birth to 21 years of age who resides in Montana at no cost to the family or school district. This means some travelling in a large, beautiful state that only has 45 or so audiologists to cover it! Yes, it does mean that she has made ear mold impressions in gas station and grocery store parking lots in rural Montana and tested hearing in countless speech rooms, music rooms and janitor's closets. She goes to school each day with many of her

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Leann Goss (), Montana School for the Deaf and Blind, lgoss@msdb.mt.gov;
Leann Goss, M.S.Ed, TOD, Outreach Consultant for Deaf and Hard of Hearing I have been a teacher of the deaf at the Montana School for the Deaf and Blind for 10 years, recently leaving the classroom to become an Outreach Consultant covering 13 counties in Central Montana. Prior to moving to Montana, I was a Parent Infant Advisor and teacher of the deaf for 10 years at Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children in San Antonio, Texas. Equal experience working in a private auditory-oral school for the deaf and then a residential total communication state school for the deaf has given me a well rounded perspective of the variety of strategies, philosophies, technological advancements, cultural influences, and vast research in the field of deaf education on which I can rely when working with children, families, and schools in providing opportunities for students with hearing loss to reach their full potential.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -