16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/27/2017  |   11:05 AM - 11:35 AM   |  Longitudinal Impact of Persistent Language Underperformance on Social Functioning in Young Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing   |  Hanover E

Longitudinal Impact of Persistent Language Underperformance on Social Functioning in Young Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Purpose: The impact of persistent language underperformance (LU) on social functioning in children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) is unknown. Objectives: Quantify impact of persistent LU on social functioning over time; evaluate differences by cognitive abilities. Methods: Children with bilateral hearing loss, 0-6 years enrolled in longitudinal study of development with standardized assessments of cognition, language, social function. Language relative to cognitive abilities defined as ratio of receptive language score to nonverbal IQ (NVIQ). Social function of children with persistent LU (ratio<0.85) and with commensurate language (ratio>0.85) were compared over time using repeated measures models. Results: 151 children enrolled, median age of identification 4 months, 54% mild-moderate HL; mean NVIQ, 95.5 (20). Mean language scores were 10.5 points lower than NVIQ (p<0.0001); 41% of children had LU. Children with >1 year follow-up, 31% had persistent LU over time. Controlling for confounders, children with persistent LU had significantly lower (16 points, p=0.0004) social function scores over time compared to those with commensurate language. After 1 year, the difference in scores between LU and commensurate groups are greatest among NVIQ>100 (83 vs. 97), with no differences among NVIQ<80 (78 vs. 77). Children across all NVIQ abilities with persistent LU made no gains in social function. Conclusion: Persistent LU has a negative impact on social development in young children who are DHH, across all levels of ability and degrees of hearing loss. Without early recognition of slower language trajectories, children are at risk to fall further behind in social functioning.

  • Recognize the importance of identifying language underperformance in children who are D/HH.
  • Identify the impact of persistent language underperformance over time on social performance.
  • Discuss implications of language underperformance for EHDI systems

Presentation:
15804_5718SusanWiley.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5718.rtf


Presenters/Authors

Susan Wiley (), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, susan.wiley@cchmc.org;
Dr. Susan Wiley is a developmental pediatrician with extensive expertise in children who are deaf/hard of hearing. She has many years of experience serving children with multiple disabilities. Dr Wiley provides leadership and guidance to the National American Academy of Pediatrics, the Ohio Department of Health Early Hearing Detection and Intervention Program, the Ohio Center for Deaf-Blind Education, and the Outreach Center for Deafness and Blindness in the Ohio Center for Low Incidence.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Jareen Meinzen-Derr (), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, jareen.meinzen-derr@cchmc.org;
Dr. Meinzen-Derr is quantitative epidemiologist at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. She has focused her research on outcomes of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, and specifically those who have additional developmental disabilities.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Grants for Independent contractor from HRSA.   Receives Grants for Independent contractor from HRSA MCH Grant.   Receives Grants for Other activities from HRSA.   Receives Grants for Other activities from HRSA.  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Sandra Grether (), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, sandra.grether@cchmc.org;
Dr. Grether is a Speech and Language Pathologist who works with children with developmental disabilities. Her expertise is in the field of augmentative and alternative communication.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Rose McAuley (), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, rose.mcauley@cchmc.org;
Rose McAuley is a speech-language pathologist who works with children who have developmental disabilities. She also has experience implementing augmentative and alternative communication into therapies for children of all levels of ability.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Daniel Choo (), Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, daniel.choo@cchmc.org;
Dr. Choo is a professor of pediatric otolaryngology at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. He is a neuro-otologist and has an extensive clinical practice and active research career in the field of childhood hearing loss.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.