16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/28/2017  |   2:15 PM - 2:45 PM   |  100 Babies Project: Identifying Outcome Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children in Georgia   |  Hanover D

100 Babies Project: Identifying Outcome Barriers for Deaf and Hard of Hearing Children in Georgia

Studies show that deaf and hard of hearing children who receive early intervention by six months of age and have access to communication can attain positive speech and language development and consequently equitable strides in education. (Moeller, 2000) While Georgia established an early hearing detection and intervention program in 2001, Georgia's deaf and hard of hearing children often perform worse on standardized reading assessments than their hearing peers. The Department of Public (DPH) suspects that not all children with hearing impairment, who have access and are enrolled in early intervention, have overcome all the barriers to access positive language development. DPH will identify and explore the factors that influence language development on children identified with hearing loss through newborn screening, including maternal and social factors, age of intervention, intensity of intervention and home language. Data sets from vital records, newborn screening, and intervention will be linked to determine if co-founding factors that influence language development significantly impact early intervention outcomes in a subset of hearing impaired diagnosed children with a birth date beginning in January 1, 2014. Identifying a relationship between maternal factors, such as level of education and age, child's insurance, home language, and language outcomes will identify areas or target groups requiring additional resources to reduce any possible disparities in outcomes. Although research supports early intervention by six months of age to attain improved development outcomes for deaf and hard of hearing children, vulnerable populations of children may be at greater risk for not meeting language outcomes in-spite early intervention. Programmatic resources can be used to improve outcomes in these populations to ensure that they do not fall behind their hearing peers.

  • Identify three factors that influence language development of children identified with hearing loss through newborn screening.
  • Determine which co-founding factors that influence language development may significantly impact early intervention outcomes among children diagnosed with hearing impairment.
  • Identify relationships of factors that point to groups that may require additional resources in order to reduce disparities in outcomes

Presentation:
15804_5548KellyDundon.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5548.rtf


Presenters/Authors

Kelly Dundon (), Georgia DPH, kelly.dundon@dph.ga.gov;
Kelly Dundon is Georgia’s Early Hearing Detection and Intervention (EHDI) Coordinator. Kelly holds a Master’s in Public Health from Georgia State University, Doctorate of Audiology from the University of Wisconsin and her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Speech, Language, and Hearing Science from the University of Colorado. Kelly began her career as a pediatric audiologist at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, which is where she became passionate about early identification of hearing impairment for at risk populations. In 2011, she enrolled in Georgia State University to obtain her Master’s in Public Health and began contracting with Georgia’s Department of Public Health to assist with the EHDI program. Kelly is committed to improving identification of hearing impairment and systems of intervention in Georgia.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Michael Lo (), Georgia Department of Public Health, michael.lo@dph.ga.gov;
Michael Lo is a Child Health Epidemiologist II at the Georgia Department of Public Health (DPH). Prior to joining DPH, he was an Injury Epidemiologist at the Florida Department of Health and as a contractor for the U.S. Army Medical Command. He received a B.A. in Biology from Johns Hopkins University and an M.S.P.H. in Epidemiology from the University of South Florida.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Grants for Employment from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Receives Grants for Employment from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).   Receives Grants for Employment from Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.