16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/27/2017  |   2:30 PM - 3:00 PM   |  EI Snapshot: an “in the Trenches” Perspective on Early Intervention for Children Who Are D/HH from Providers and Audiologists   |  Hanover A

EI Snapshot: an “in the Trenches” Perspective on Early Intervention for Children Who Are D/HH from Providers and Audiologists

Earlier identification combined with advanced hearing technology (such as cochlear implants and digital hearing aids) and early intervention (EI) has resulted in improved outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (D/HH;Turchetti et. al., 2011; Sparreboom et. al., 2010; Bond, et. al., 2009). Unfortunately, there is a shortage of professionals trained to provide specialized services to infants and toddlers (Muñoz, Bradham, & Nelson, 2011).  A recent NCHAM study – Early Intervention Systematic Nationwide Analysis of Programs’ Strengths, Hurdles, Opportunities, and Trends (SNAPSHOT) funded by the Maternal and Child Health Bureau surveyed early intervention providers and audiologists in ten states serving families of children who are D/HH to obtain information about their educational background - including their training in communication modalities - along with the types of services they provide. Additionally, providers were asked about connecting families to support organizations and the extent to which they collaborate with other specialists. Results showed that audiologists often provide families with information about EI services, and they often provide EI programs with evaluation information. However, few audiologists report being part of the IFSP team or receiving a copy of the IFSP. Providers rated themselves as knowledgeable about most communication opportunities, except for cued speech. Open-ended comments reflected that providers believe the EI system is working well in general, although they would appreciate more training pertaining to non-D/HH specific family support organizations, such as e Parent Training and Information Centers or Family-to-Family Health Information Centers as well as financial resources for families. This presentation will highlight the strengths and challenges reported by EI providers and audiologists. Results pertaining to their interactions with one another and other EHDI partners will be shared. Strategies to foster collaboration will be discussed, providing guidance as to how we can improve the EI component of the EHDI system.

  • Gain an overview of practicing EI providers’ and audiologists’training and experience.
  • Learn recommendations from providers on how to improve the EI system.
  • Identify ways to support and foster collaboration among EI providers, audiologists and other EHDI system partners.

Presentation:
15804_5781DianeBehl.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5781.doc


Presenters/Authors

Diane Behl (), NCHAM, diane.behl@usu.edu;
Diane Behl is a Senior Faculty member at the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management. She facilitates telehealth learning communities and is a co-investigator for cost-effectiveness studies. She has expertise in evaluating the effectiveness of service coordination provided via Part C Early Intervention and Maternal and Child Health programs. Diane was a primary researcher on the EI SNAPSHOT study.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Sara Doutre (), NCHAM, saradoutre@gmail.com;
Sara Doutre is a PHD student studying sociobehavioral epidemiology at Utah State University. She has an MA in education policy studies and a BS in elementary and special education. A former special education teacher, she currently consults with state departments of education and health on special education policy. Her six-year-old daughter is deaf due to congenital cytomegalovirus.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Heather Mariger (), Utah State University, heather.mariger@usu.edu;
Heather Mariger is a research scientist with the NCHAM at Utah State University where she is currently working on the Early Intervention Systemic Nationwide Analysis of Programs’ Strengths, Hurdles, Opportunities, and Trends (EI SNAPSHOT) project. Heather comes to NCHAM through an unusual route. Classically trained in Culinary Arts and Hospitality she has worked and studied across both the US and Europe. While working on her Masters Degree at Kansas State University, she became intrigued by the possibilities that the Internet promised for higher education. These interests led her to Utah State where, while working on her Doctorate in Instructional Technology, she became involved in disability research – and has never looked back. She has worked across a wide variety of assignments including projects to: create videos, websites and a curriculum to teach parents and paraprofessionals about the use of naturalistic interventions in teaching young children; develop a set of indicators and resources to promote web accessibility in higher education; and design training and protocols for a large-scale intervention/control study on the effect of an additional school 25 days on children in K-3rd grade. She is currently working on a study to help understand the state of early intervention services for children who are D/HH and their parents across the US. Her interests include Usability, Accessibility, the use of internet and mobile technologies to promote parent services and support, and Inclusive Tourism/Hospitality.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.