16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

<< BACK TO AGENDA

2/28/2017  |   3:00 PM - 3:30 PM   |  Measuring Developmental Progress over Time: Clinical Implications and National Outcomes   |  Hanover E

Measuring Developmental Progress over Time: Clinical Implications and National Outcomes

This two-part presentation will begin by describing a comprehensive, child-level assessment battery that is in line with the most recent best-practice guidelines from the Joint Committee on Infant Hearing. Information will be provided on how to use these assessments to monitor a child’s progress over time throughout the birth to 3-year-old period. This will include 1) the logistics of establishing a systematic, program-wide child assessment system, 2) suggestions for working with parents to assure assessment completion and accuracy, and 3) tips for using the results of the assessment in counselling families and setting child goals. We will describe how the outcomes from these assessments are shared with the National Early Childhood Assessment Project (NECAP) in order to obtain program-level accountability data and to contribute to our knowledge of outcomes for children with hearing loss at a national level. To date, 12 states have contributed over 2,000 assessments to the NECAP project creating a large national database of language outcomes for children who are deaf or hard of hearing from birth to 3 years of age. In the second part of this presentation, longitudinal language and general developmental outcomes from the NECAP project will be presented with a focus on describing children’s rate of progress over time relative to the developmental growth of hearing children. In addition, we will examine factors (such as if EHDI guidelines were met, degree of hearing loss, parents’ level of education and other child and family characteristics) that are predictive of language growth in children with hearing loss that follows the trajectory expected for hearing children of the same age.

  • Describe an assessment battery that can be used to monitor language and other developmental progress over time across the birth to 3 period
  • Characterize the typical rate of language growth across the birth to 3 period in children who are deaf or hard of hearing
  • List risk factors for language delay and factors associated with more successful language growth outcomes

Presentation:
15804_5617AllisonSedey.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5617.rtf


Presenters/Authors

Allison Sedey (), University of Colorado-Boulder, Allison.Sedey@colorado.edu;
Allison Sedey is a speech pathologist, audiologist, and research associate. She works for the University of Colorado-Boulder and the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind tracking speech and language outcomes of children who are deaf or hard of hearing between birth and 3 years of age throughout the state of Colorado. In addition, she provides accountability data to the Colorado Shared Reading Project regarding parent progress and program effectiveness. She recently completed a project (NECAP) that involved establishing a national database of language outcomes for children with hearing loss from birth to 4.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Salary for Employment from Centers for Disease Control.   Receives Salary for Employment from Centers for Disease Control.  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Lindsay Rodriguez (), Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children, lrodriguez@sunshinecottage.org;
Lindsay M Rodriguez, M.Ed., C.E.D., has been a Parent-Infant Advisor at Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children in San Antonio since 2000. She is bilingual (English/Spanish) and previously worked for 16 years as an ESL teacher and textbook author/editor for Macmillan Publishers in Mexico City. Lindsay has also been trained as a Parent Advocacy Training Facilitator for the A.G.Bell Association and has given presentations on Advocacy internationally and in several different States. Lindsay is a coauthor of The Guide to Listening and Spoken Language: a parent-friendly, convenient checklist of information and strategies for learning to listen and talk. Lindsay’s mission is to coach parents to advocate for their child so that their child, in turn, might advocate for him/herself.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Craig Mason (), University of Maine, craig.mason@maine.edu;
Craig A. Mason,Ph.D. is a Professor of Education and Applied Quantitative Methods at the University of Maine. He received his PhD in Clinical Child Psychology from the University of Washington and his interests include informatics, newborn hearing loss, and quantitative methods. Dr. Mason has been PI or Co-PI on $15 million in grants and contracts from the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of Health, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Department of Education. In addition, he has published, presented, and taught on multivariate analysis, multi-level modeling, epidemiological analysis, structural equation modeling, and growth modeling. He has been invited to present on methodology and informatics by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the National Association for Public Health Statistics and Information Systems, the Department of Health and Human Services, the Association of Maternal and Child Health Programs, and other national organizations.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Julianna Wanek (), Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children, jwanek@sunshinecottage.org;
Julianna Wanek graduated from the University of Texas with a Bachelor of Science in Communication Sciences and Disorders, specializing in Deaf Education. During her time as an undergraduate, she interned at several schools, including Texas School for the Deaf and the Austin Regional Day School Program. Julianna went on to receive her Masters in Deaf Education and Hearing Science from the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. While working on her graduate degree, Julianna volunteered in classrooms and worked as a graduate assistant at Sunshine Cottage School for Deaf Children. During her coursework, she realized her love for working with children in early intervention and became a parent infant advisor at Sunshine in January of 2015. Julianna is a Certified Educator of the Deaf by the state of Texas and is currently seeking certification as a Listening and Spoken Language Specialist.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Christine Yoshinaga-Itano (), University of Colorado-Boulder, Christie.Yoshi@colorado.edu;
Dr. Christine Yoshinaga-Itano is a Research Professor in the Institute of Cognitive Science, Center for Neurosciences at the University of Colorado-Boulder, the Department of Otolaryngology and Audiology at the University of Colorado-Denver and the Marion Downs Center. In 1996 she developed the Marion Downs National Center. Since 1996, Dr. Yoshinaga-Itano has assisted many state departments of education and public health agencies, schools for the deaf and the blind, and early intervention programs throughout the United States and its territories. In addition, she has served as a consultant for many countries currently developing their early hearing detection and intervention programs, including the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Japan, China, Korea, Belgium, Poland, Spain, Austria, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, the Netherlands, Mexico, Chile, Argentina, Brazil, Thailand, the Philippines, and South Africa.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - Receives Other financial benefit for Other activities from grant recipient from AUCD/CDC.   Receives Other financial benefit for Membership on advisory committee or review panels,Other activities from grant recipient from AUCD/CDC.   Receives Other financial benefit for Other activities from grant recipient form AUCD/CDC.   Receives Other financial benefit for Other activities from grant recipient AUCD/CDC.   Receives Other financial benefit for Other activities from grant recipient AUCD/CDC.   Receives Salary,Grants for Other activities from Disability Research Dissemination Center.  

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.