16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/28/2017  |   3:00 PM - 3:30 PM   |  Overcoming the Impact of Implicit Bias   |  Grand Hall D

Overcoming the Impact of Implicit Bias

"Implicit bias refers to the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions and decisions in an unconscious manner. These biases, which encompass both favorable and unfavorable assessments, are activated involuntarily and without an individual's awareness or intentional control." (Statts, C. Kirwan Institute, 2014). Research has demonstrated a correlation between implicit bias and patient care in terms of communication, treatment recommendations and trust between provider and patient. As early intervention providers working closely with families with families of different races, cultures and backgrounds it is crucial that we acknowledge implicit bias exists and work to overcome it in order to provide quality services for children with hearing loss. This presentation will share the latest research on implicit bias and the impact it has on healthcare, give participants an opportunity to explore their own cultural identity, and discuss ways in which we can reduce the impact of bias in our work with families. Specific attention will be given to empathetic listening with video tape examples and opportunities for listening practice. How one team has utilized the Engaging Parents, Developing Leaders; A Self-Assessment and Planning Tool for Nonprofits and Schools by the Annie E. Casey Foundation, published in August 2016 will also be discussed.

  • The learner will be able to describe implicit bias and the current research on it's impact to healthcare.
  • The learner will be able to demonstrate empathetic listening in order to be able to utilize it in their early intervention practices.
  • The learner will be able to list resources for further learning on culturally effective practice, their own implicit bias and non-violent communication for families in the early intervention model.

Presentation:
15804_5796HannahEskridge.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5796.RTF


Presenters/Authors

Hannah Eskridge (), University of North Carolina, hannah.eskridge@unchealth.unc.edu;
Hannah Eskridge, MSP, CCC-SLP, LSLS Cert AVT, is the Co-Director for the Children's Cochlear Implant Center at UNC and Assistant Professor in the Department of Otolaryngology, University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. She has been working with children with hearing loss and their families for over 15 years and became certified in auditory verbal therapy in 2005. She conducts Listening and Spoken Language parent participation sessions and tele-therapy sessions through the UNC REACH program. Her primary interests are related to coaching professionals throughout the world in order to see the field of Listening and Spoken Language expand as well as working with families just beginning their journey in teaching their children with hearing loss to listen and talk.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.