16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/28/2017  |   11:00 AM - 11:30 AM   |  Baby Beats and Beyond   |  Grand Hall D

Baby Beats and Beyond

Hearing loss in children is a “neurodevelopmental emergency.” This is because there is an optimal time for important brain development and meaningful auditory neural connections to form. The age at which children receive a hearing loss diagnosis have improved dramatically with Universal Newborn Hearing Screening mandates. Early identification has allowed for more proactive habilitation practices for children with severe to profound degrees of hearing loss. There is mounting evidence that encourages the use of music to support the parental/caregiver bond with their new-identified baby, in addition to laying a solid foundation for listening, speaking and literacy skills. As professionals, it is our responsibility to remain on the forefront in our approaches to work with children diagnosed with hearing loss. In both clinical practice and in our listening and spoken language pre-school, we have found integrating music into weekly Auditory-Verbal therapy sessions, in small classroom settings and through parent carry over activities to be the cornerstone of our success. Plus, listening, singing and making music are among the most enjoyable learning activities for children! Music and speech have overlapping components which make music a natural way to support listening and spoken language development. Our session will highlight Erber’s hierarchy of auditory awareness through various musical techniques and describe music milestones all children can achieve with consistent exposure. In addition, we will share extension materials we have incorporated throughout the school year, paired with various musical trails to facilitate listening, speaking and literacy skills.

  • 1. Participants will describe why music exposure is an essential component to the foundation of early language development.
  • 2. Participants will identify levels of the auditory hierarchy that can be supported with various music materials for infants and toddlers.
  • 3. Participants will create a BabyBeats™ lesson plan for children, with various hearing histories, combining developmentally appropriate music milestones, mixed music mediums (musical trails and/or instruments) and extension activities based on the children’s listening and language age.

Presentation:
15804_5828JenniferWickesberg.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
CART transcripts are NOT YET available, but will be posted shortly after the conference


Presenters/Authors

Jennifer Wickesberg (), The Center for Hearing and Speech, jennifer@centerhearingandspeech.org;
Dr. Wickesberg is an audiologist and a Certified Listening and Spoken Language Specialist. She received her Bachelor's of Science in Speech-Language Pathology from Oklahoma State University, her Master's of Science in Audiology from the University of North Texas and her Doctorate in Audiology from the University of Florida. Dr. Wickesberg currently serves as the Director of Audiology at The Center for Hearing and Speech.. In addition to her clinical work, she conducts research with a cochlear implant focus, shares her clinical expertise nationally, and trains fourth-year Au.D. externs, as well as mentors other aspiring listening and spoken language professionals. Dr. Wickesberg is one of 14 Core Faculty on the LoneStar LEND (Leadership Education in Neurodevelopmental and Related Disabilities) program, funded through a $2.9 million grant from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA). It is the first program of its kind in Texas and one of only 43 LEND programs located at universities or major children’s hospitals across the United States. Its mission is to prepare future leaders in the diagnosis and treatment of autistic spectrum disorders and neurodevelopmental disabilities (ASD/ND), increase the rate of accurate diagnosis of ASD/NDs in Texas, empower families to be an active participant in their child’s treatment plan and improve ASD/ND service delivery and systems. She also serves on the Community Advisory Board for the University of Houston’s Communication Sciences and Disorders Department, and is an Adjunct Assistant Professor for the University of Houston’s Communication Sciences and Disorders Department.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Rosie Hirschfeld (), The Center for Hearing and Speech, rhirschfeld@centerhearingandspeech.org;
Rosemary Hirschfeld has a Bachelors of Art in Elementary Education with a Masters of Science in Early Intervention in Deaf Education from Fontbonne University. She is currently in her fourth year as a teacher of the Deaf at the Melinda Webb School in Houston, Texas and in the first year of pursuing her LSLS AVEd certification.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.