16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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  |  Teaching the Teachers: a Review of Deaf Education Personnel Preparation Programs

Teaching the Teachers: a Review of Deaf Education Personnel Preparation Programs

Improved technology and early hearing screenings help detect hearing issues in infants and young children much sooner than ever before. However, a diminishing number of Deaf Education Programs is creating a worrying shortage of deaf education teachers trained to meet the needs of these students who are D/HH. This shortage is especially noticeable in the early intervention arena(1). NCHAM recently conducted the Early Intervention Systemic Nationwide Analysis of Programs’ Strengths, Hurdles, Opportunities, and Trends (EI SNAPSHOT) study, funded by MCHB, to review the state of Early Intervention services for children who are D/HH across the US. As part of the study EI SNAPSHOT conducted a review of the Deaf Education Programs across the country to determine how emerging teachers are being prepared to serve the D/HH community. 70 deaf education preparation programs from 51 universities were identified using a list published by the American Annals of the Deaf, and deafed.net’s - Educational Enhancement for the field of Deaf Education. Information was gathered from each institutional website on program requirements; practicum experience; and time spent on special education, early intervention, audiology, and different communication modalities. Customized reports were developed for each program and were used to inform follow-up telephone interviews with program directors. Through these interviews, researchers were able to correct the often inaccurate or incomplete website information, delve into other areas covered by the programs and learn more about student placement and employment after graduation. This poster will provide an overview of the different programs available and examine the results of the interviews, including themes on program strengths and weaknesses from the standpoints of the program directors themselves. (1)American Annals of the Deaf, Volume 160, Number 4, Fall 2015, pp. 356-367

  • To learn more about the state of Deaf Education Programs across the US
  • To better understand the experiences and education of emerging deaf education teachers
  • To learn what topics and areas of emphasis are covered and what areas may need more promotion

Presentation:
15804_5767HeatherMariger.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
CART transcripts are NOT YET available, but will be posted shortly after the conference


Presenters/Authors

Diane Behl (), NCHAM, diane.behl@usu.edu;
Diane Behl is a Senior Faculty member at the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management. She facilitates telehealth learning communities and is a co-investigator for cost-effectiveness studies. She has expertise in evaluating the effectiveness of service coordination provided via Part C Early Intervention and Maternal and Child Health programs. Diane was a primary researcher on the EI SNAPSHOT study.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Sara Doutre (), NCHAM, saradoutre@gmail.com;
Sara Doutre is a PHD student studying sociobehavioral epidemiology at Utah State University. She has an MA in education policy studies and a BS in elementary and special education. A former special education teacher, she currently consults with state departments of education and health on special education policy. Her six-year-old daughter is deaf due to congenital cytomegalovirus.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Heather Mariger (), Utah State University, heather.mariger@usu.edu;
Heather Mariger is a research scientist with the NCHAM at Utah State University where she is currently working on the Early Intervention Systemic Nationwide Analysis of Programs’ Strengths, Hurdles, Opportunities, and Trends (EI SNAPSHOT) project. Heather comes to NCHAM through an unusual route. Classically trained in Culinary Arts and Hospitality she has worked and studied across both the US and Europe. While working on her Masters Degree at Kansas State University, she became intrigued by the possibilities that the Internet promised for higher education. These interests led her to Utah State where, while working on her Doctorate in Instructional Technology, she became involved in disability research – and has never looked back. She has worked across a wide variety of assignments including projects to: create videos, websites and a curriculum to teach parents and paraprofessionals about the use of naturalistic interventions in teaching young children; develop a set of indicators and resources to promote web accessibility in higher education; and design training and protocols for a large-scale intervention/control study on the effect of an additional school 25 days on children in K-3rd grade. She is currently working on a study to help understand the state of early intervention services for children who are D/HH and their parents across the US. Her interests include Usability, Accessibility, the use of internet and mobile technologies to promote parent services and support, and Inclusive Tourism/Hospitality.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.