16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

<< BACK TO AGENDA

2/27/2017  |   11:05 AM - 11:35 AM   |  Hispanic Family Attitudes, Perceptions, and Experiences Related to Pediatric Hearing Loss   |  Hanover B

Hispanic Family Attitudes, Perceptions, and Experiences Related to Pediatric Hearing Loss

Approximately 3 per 1,000 newborns in the United States have permanent hearing loss – more than any other birth defect, with non-Hispanic and Hispanic ethnicity evenly represented (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2012). When children have a permanent hearing loss, parents have a central role in the intervention process; however, many experience an array of challenges implementing recommended interventions (Muñoz et al., 2014; Muñoz et al., 2015; Muñoz et al., 2016). These challenges can interfere with child outcomes. The research to date has primarily provided insights into experiences of white families with mid- to high-income levels (Muñoz et al., 2015; Muñoz, Blaiser, & Barwick, 2013; Walker et al., 2013; Muñoz et al., 2014; Moeller, Hoover, Peterson, & Stelmachowicz, 2009; Sjoblad, Harrison, Roush, & McWilliam, 2001). In a recent study, Caballero et al. (in press) explored hearing aid management challenges and support needs of Hispanic parents, and found that parents wanted more support, information and training from the audiologist, and they experienced challenges that interfered with how much their child used their hearing aids. The population of the United States is becoming more diverse, and oftentimes, minority groups retain their distinctive cultural values and practices, rather than adopting those of the majority culture (Stockman, Boult, & Robinson, 2004). Little is known about Hispanic family’s attitudes and perceptions about pediatric hearing loss and how that may influence challenges they experience with accessing services and managing intervention recommendations. This presentation will present the findings of seven Hispanic families, describing their attitudes and perceptions about hearing loss, and their experiences. We anticipate that the information presented in this study, will be helpful for professionals working with diverse populations, to gain a more in depth understanding of attitudes, perceptions, and experiences of Hispanic families related to having a child identified with permanent hearing loss.

  • Describe the attitudes, perceptions, and experiences of Hispanic families.
  • Explain the Hispanic family's attitudes, and perceptions about pediatric hearing loss and how this may influence the challenges they experience with accessing services and managing intervention recommendations.
  • Identify and understand the attitudes, perceptions, and experiences of Hispanic families related to having a child with permanent hearing loss, to be more prepared to provide services to this diverse population.

Presentation:
15804_5722AnaCaballero.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5722.docx


Presenters/Authors

Karen Munoz (), Utah State University, karen.munoz@usu.edu;
Karen Muñoz is interim department head and associate professor of audiology at Utah State University in the Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education. She is also associate director of the National Center for Hearing Assessment and Management. Her research focus is in the area of childhood hearing loss.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Ana Caballero (), Utah State University, ana.caballero@usu.edu;
Ana Caballero is a student in the Doctorate of Audiology program at Utah State University. She is originally from El Salvador, she obtained her Medical Degree in Cuba. Her native language is Spanish. She earned her Second Bachelor at the University of Utah in Communicative Disorders (Speech and Hearing BS) in 2013. Because of her previous medical background and coming from a developing country, she worked several years with kids and adults at different rural areas and underprivileged communities. She enjoys working around people, she is passionate about working with Hispanic children and their families, teaching them how to become advocates for their kids, as well as helping with language barriers. After she graduates, she wants to work with kids with hearing loss and different disabilities and their families, hoping to become a support and advocate for an equal access to health services.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Lauri Nelson (), Utah State University, lauri.nelson@usu.edu;
Lauri Nelson is an Associate Professor in the Department of Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education in the Listening and Spoken Language Deaf Education program at Utah State University. She has a dual background in both clinical audiology and LSL deaf education and currently directs the LSL deaf education graduate training program at Utah State University.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Renee Lucero (), Utah State University, renee.lucero@usu.edu;
Renee Lucero is currently a faculty member in the Listening and Spoken Language Graduate Training Program, a division of the Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education Department at Utah State University. Her interests include working with culturally and linguistically diverse families and implementing listening and spoken language practices in the school setting.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -


Brittan Barker (), Utah State University, brittan.barker@usu.edu;
Brittan Barker is an Assistant Professor in the Communicative Disorders and Deaf Education Department at Utah State University. Dr. Barker is the Principal Investigator of the Spoken Language Processing Lab at Utah State University.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial -

Nonfinancial -