16th ANNUAL EARLY HEARING DETECTION & INTERVENTION MEETING
February 26-28, 2017 • Atlanta, GA

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2/27/2017  |   11:05 AM - 11:35 AM   |  Social-Emotional Development: How EI Providers Can Support Infants, Toddlers and their Families    |  Hanover C

Social-Emotional Development: How EI Providers Can Support Infants, Toddlers and their Families 

The goal of early intervention is to support the overall developmental needs of the infant and toddler to maximize each child’s potential. While programs and services for infants and toddlers who are deaf and hard-of-hearing emphasize communication and language development, they may not provide sufficient support for other critical areas. Caregivers and early intervention providers may not consider the importance of also establishing goals for children’s social-emotional development (Oliva & Lytle, 2016). Yet, experts in early childhood development have documented that growth in one area impacts development across other domains. For young children who are deaf or hard-of-hearing, as with all children, communication skills are best learned through positive social experiences. Alternatively, communicative and linguistic skills can help foster strong social-emotional functioning; thus, attention needs to be given across developmental domains (Calderon, 2000; Calderon & Greenberg, 2011; Vygotsky, 1978). This presentation will highlight several topics aimed at promoting early intervention providers’ skills:  1) understand the importance of social emotional well-being and its relevance to overall development, 2) appreciate how social development unfolds and is fostered in the early years of life, and 3) provide resources and support to both children and their families that promote overall social emotional health. Presenters will address the three areas described above based on their areas of expertise in early childhood development, development of social and emotional health, family support, and knowledge and experiences from the perspectives of Deaf adults. Presenters will provide strategies for supporting early social-emotional skills while also working with families, deaf adults and other specialists. Participants will have the opportunity to share their experiences and contribute to the discussion.

  • Identify two ways in which social-emotional well-being has the potential to have a direct impact on a child’s overall development.
  • Describe a minimum of three factors that can influence how social development unfolds in the early years of life.
  • List a minimum of three resources and/or supports that can be made available to families that aim to promote positive social-emotional health in the child.

Presentation:
15804_5726AmySzarkowski.pdf

Handouts:
Handout is not Available

Transcripts:
5726 (2).rtf
5726.rtf


Presenters/Authors

Marilyn Sass-Lehrer (), Gallaudet University, marilyn.sass-lehrer@gallaudet.edu;
Marilyn Sass-Lehrer is Professor Emerita at Gallaudet University in Washington, DC. She received a master’s degree in Deaf Education from New York University and a Ph.D. from the University of Maryland in Early Childhood Education and Curriculum and Instruction. She is an adjunct professor in Gallaudet University's Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Their Families Interdisciplinary Program. She is editor of Early Intervention for Deaf and Hard-of- Hearing Infants, Toddlers and their Families: Interdisciplinary Perspectives (2016), and has several other publications related to early intervention. Dr. Sass-Lehrer is actively involved in professional development and learning for early intervention providers.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Amy Szarkowski (), Boston Children's Hospital & Harvard Medical School, Amy.Szarkowski@childrens.harvard.edu;
Dr. Szarkowski is a Psychologist in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Program, Dept. of Otolaryngology & Communication Enhancement, at Boston Children's Hospital (BCH). She is on the faculty in the Dept of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School. Dr. Szarkowski is Director of Psychology for the LEND program at BCH and is involved in training future health care providers. Dr. Szarkowski also teaches in the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families Collaboration and Leadership program at Gallaudet University,

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Tawny Holmes (), National Association of the Deaf, tawny.holmes@nad.org;
Tawny Holmes is the Education Policy Counsel at the National Association of the Deaf along with being Assistant Professor in the ASL and Deaf Studies department at Gallaudet University. She graduated from the University of Baltimore School of Law. In addition to her law degree, she has a Master of Arts in Family Centered Early Education. Ms. Holmes has worked three years in teaching deaf and hard of hearing students, mainly in the early childhood education field. As part of her position, she focuses on improving/establishing federal and state policy related to early intervention and education of deaf and hard of hearing children. Ms. Holmes strongly believes in the power of collaboration and has contributed a significant amount of her work towards this endeavor, in varying ways, from promoting parent resources to inclusion of deaf and hard of hearing adult professionals.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Audra McCorkle (), University of Northern Colorado, audra.mccorkle@gmail.com;
Audra McCorkle is a graduate student at University of Northern Colorado (UNC) for Teaching American Sign Language (TASL) program. She is also in Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers, and their Families Interdisciplinary Program through Gallaudet University in Washington DC. Audra works through Early Intervention Reading Program through Colorado Springs School for Deaf and Blind (CSDB) and also works part time as Graduate Teacher Assistant (GTA) teaching ASL 101 at her university, UNC.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.


Emily Wojahn (), Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind, ewojahn@csdb.org;
Emily Wojahn, M.A, is a Kindergarten-2nd grade teacher in the Family-Centered Early Education department at the Colorado School for the Deaf and the Blind (CSDB). There she is the team lead for her department and has helped plan and lead family involvement workshops for families of deaf and hard of hearing children who are 0-8 years old. During the summer 2017, Emily completed the Deaf and Hard of Hearing Infants, Toddlers and Families: Collaboration and Leadership certificate program through Gallaudet University including a capstone project proposing a parent-infant program for CSDB. Emily’s passions include meeting the needs of the child in the family system and promoting a love of reading among all children.

ASHA DISCLOSURE:

Financial - No relevant financial relationship exist.

Nonfinancial - No relevant nonfinancial relationship exist.